Jennifer Golbeck: The curly fry conundrum: Why social media “likes” say more than you might think

Jennifer Golbeck: The curly fry conundrum: Why social media “likes” say more than you might think

Much can be done with online data. But did you know that computer wonks once determined that liking a Facebook page about curly fries means you’re also intel…

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skeletonxf says:

To quote the video description: ‘But did you know that computer wonks once
determined that liking a Facebook page about curly fries means you’re also
intelligent? Really.’ Is simply a terrible rephrasing of what the video
states, correlation shown here to link due to the types of people on your
friends list in now way has any cause or effect. No control over my data?
Please, I don’t have to share everything I do or would consider liking.
People can control all but required data *by not giving it* >.< If I want to upload a photo to Facebook, all I must do to stop companies seeing it is post it as unlisted on imgur and link to it, all my friends can see it just fine, Facebook data companies get no access at all. If I want to keep a like or such private, I can't, but I can usually go to the dedicated site and just follow stuff there On twitter, I don't even need an account to read through most pages and I'd really like to see what happens if a company try to log my ip address and sell that on for data to use. I could go for all sorts of dynamic ips if I had to. Controlling data once its out there is as the video put nearly impossible, but the control is *already there*, on the submit/post button. Automated data that third parties get from you without your consent is of course a whole different story.

seven2success says:

TEDTalk Tuesday • April 8, 2014

One TEDTalk a week. Every Tuesday. A Talk by an inspiring woman. Brought to
you by http://www.seven2success.com

Today featuring Jennifer Golbeck | The curly fry conondrum: Why social
media ‘likes’ say more than you might think

Do you like curly fries? Have you Liked them on Facebook? Watch this talk
to find out the surprising things Facebook [and others] can guess about you
from your random Likes and Shares. Computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck
explains how this came about, how some applications of the technology are
not so cute — and why she thinks we should return the control of
information to its rightful owners.

‘As a computer scientist, I’ve been able to build models that can predict
all sorts of hidden attributes for all of you that you don’t even know
you’re sharing information about.’ ~Jennifer Golbeck

Makes you think…

#TED #TEDTalk #women #invinciblewomen #socialmedia

shinjinobrave says:

A smart guy made a page called ‘curly fries’? If he’s really that
intelligent, that like must also be indicative of shame….

abrightside says:

Probably the worst TED talk I’ve seen

Nick Rat says:

I like how she makes nothing into facts. must be really hard to keep a job
selling snake oil these days.

artifactingreality says:

the people cant have been that intelligent if they like the first random
thing their friend likes. also this woman is silly and needs to get a dress
that fits her boobs properly.

ExON Norway says:

The thing that’s most indicative of high intelligence is not using
facebook.

J Kony says:

Damn this bitch is fat and that dress isn’t doing her any favours. Look
like an old alice in wonderland #realtalk 

SpecificLove says:

Wow, I am glad I keep most of my stuff private

DJ Blur says:

When they first introduced the Like it would update to all your friends
news feed as “Username Likes Curly Fries” then they made it so people could
make Facebook Pages… then just because Curly Fries are a popular food…
whoever made that page now suddenly has millions of “Fans” and can use it
to post whatever they want. Now there’s just a small side scroll that show
you your friends recent likes because its not a main feature anymore and it
would get annoying

Rayne Darren says:

I’m getting this Gattaca feeling but instead of psysical characteristics
its with personal attributes..

Henry Babor says:

Waitwat, 1.2 billion users per month = about 1/7th of the world not half
wtf

mrfishgun says:

Joke’s on them – I like curly fries and I’m an idiot :p

Marguerita Farrell says:

knowledge equals power, how much knowledge about you, are you giving up?

As Jennifer Golbeck says, more science please, give the user back the power

Well worth while listening to and a very well said, warning for all social
network users

Quote:-
“Much can be done with online data. But did you know that computer wonks
once determined that liking a Facebook page about curly fries means you’re
also intelligent? Really. Computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck explains how
this came about, how some applications of the technology are not so benign
— and why she thinks we should return the control of information to its
rightful owners.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from
the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the
talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology,
Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts
and much more.
Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at
http://www.ted.com/translate

#privacy #privacyconcerns #scienceeveryday #socialmedia 

Mellosaxsexy says:

This video in itself is in some ways like the curly fries. It creates
another “virus” which will spread, and people will be put into categories.
(using Google analytics systems) Now, how to use these systems to benefit
users, I think is the better question to answer. 

fourtwozerojb says:

Wake up and resist the chains ur willingly putting yourselves into, sheeple

zeeet says:

How can the pool of people who like the curly fries page remain so
homogeneous? Wouldn’t a lot of lower intelligence people also like it and
mix up the pool? You can’t say that the first person to like a page, or the
person who creates it, is the indicator of what the rest of the people are
going to be like 

walperstyle says:

This is why I ‘like’ random things. Today I like Terrorism, tomorrow I
like bunny rabbits. Good luck advertisement agencies. 

James Highberger says:

Gplus
If you watch the entirety of the video…
would you trade freedom of electronic movement or action for the removed
popularity or relationships social media brings? Would you assume an
anonymous identity to “truly be yourself” if being yourself meant you
couldn’t ever associate it with “you” for fear of what the linked
attributes might say?

Hans Van Ingelgom says:

How social networks know more about you than you think..

Netsanet Ashenafi says:

This is genius! give the user control over their own information. 

OmnitardFukdUrMum says:

She could use my data anytime she wants ;)…. 

IceJT15 says:

“Hey, this guy’s name is Jordan Trepanier, he is a 20 year old male that
lives in Montreal Quebec”
“See no one cares”

Brian E. says:

Now I want some fries….

ZVox Media says:

Damn, she’s really sexy!
The info is great too.
The NSA collecting all that data… It seems like they don’t know what to
do with it.
As we can see with this Target thing, you don’t need to collect it all.
You need to understand the data and how it can make predictions.
Government sucks at everything it does.

menkooomigen says:

“half the worlds population use facebook”

Learn to do math, you stupid bitch “computer scientist.”

Daniel Manahan says:

Don’t ever buy anything that you know about because of an advertisement
alone.

LemmingsGoPOP! says:

Well said. Consent is a start but not enough. Think “terms and
conditions.” What we need is education about how our information is being
used and some kind of control over the outcome.

Jennifer x says:

I’m gonna go like curly fries on facebook now.

Neptutron says:

8:41 Why the fu*k is there a timer counting down her speech time?!

Henry Stradford says:

None of your goddamn business!!

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